Changes over Time: Water, Bridges, and Transport

A source of flowing water is paramount to building flourishing life, as is it to facilitate the exchange of goods, ideas and cultures. Transport was at the core of industrial developments in the past four decades, ever adapting to new changes and ever expanding mankind’s possibilities.This source collection aims to contribute to enable students to explore aspects of the concept of change, by offering artistic evidence on the way waterways, bridges and harbours have been used in Europe from the 17th century to the 20th century.Acknowledgements: Source collection made by Henrik Hartmann. The collection makes use of sources from the Europeana Collections. Thumbnail image: (Fleet Messengers ‘HMS Asphodel’ and ‘HMS Ivy’ at Malta, Frank H. Mason, 1914-1918, Imperial War Museum via Europeana, IWM Non-Commercial Licence)

This source collection is made by Henrik Hartmann. The collection makes use of sources from the Europeana Collections and is developed as part of the Europeana DSI3 project, which is co-financed by the European Union Connecting Europe Facility.

Mid-17th century

People entertaining themselves on a frozen river in the Netherlands in the 1650s. (Aert van der Neer, 1655-1660, Rijksmuseum via Europeana)

Mid-17th century

People entertaining themselves on a frozen river in the Netherlands in the 1650s. (Aert van der Neer, 1655-1660, Rijksmuseum via Europeana)

Mid-17th century

View of the Nieuwe Kerk (New Church) in Amsterdam, in the 1660s. (Anthoine Beerstraaten, 1664-1667, Swedish Nationalmuseum via Europeana)

Mid-17th century

View of the Nieuwe Kerk (New Church) in Amsterdam, in the 1660s. (Anthoine Beerstraaten, 1664-1667, Swedish Nationalmuseum via Europeana)

Late 17th century

Ships of the British Royal Navy laying in reserve in the Medway River, between Chatham and Rochester, South East England (some 50km east of London), around 1675. (Ships Laid Up in the Medway, Netherlandish School, circa 1675, Royal Museums Greenwich via Europeana)

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Late 17th century

Ships of the British Royal Navy laying in reserve in the Medway River, between Chatham and Rochester, South East England (some 50km east of London), around 1675. (Ships Laid Up in the Medway, Netherlandish School, circa 1675, Royal Museums Greenwich via Europeana)

Early 18th century

The Canal Grande with the Rialto Bridge (centre), and the Fondaco dei Tedeschi (left, headquarters and restricted living quarters of Venice’s German merchants), in Venice, in the first half of the 17th century. (Atelier Canaletto, 1707-1750, Rijksmuseum via Europeana)

Early 18th century

The Canal Grande with the Rialto Bridge (centre), and the Fondaco dei Tedeschi (left, headquarters and restricted living quarters of Venice’s German merchants), in Venice, in the first half of the 17th century. (Atelier Canaletto, 1707-1750, Rijksmuseum via Europeana)

Mid-18th century

Launch of the ‘Cambridge’ at the Royal Dockyard of Deptford in 1755 (within present-day London) on the left, and a view of the ‘Royal George’ on the right. The ‘Royal George’ was, however, only launched a year later, in 1756, at the Woolwich Dockyard (within present-day London). (John Cleveley, 1757, Royal Museums Greenwich via Europeana)

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Mid-18th century

Launch of the ‘Cambridge’ at the Royal Dockyard of Deptford in 1755 (within present-day London) on the left, and a view of the ‘Royal George’ on the right. The ‘Royal George’ was, however, only launched a year later, in 1756, at the Woolwich Dockyard (within present-day London). (John Cleveley, 1757, Royal Museums Greenwich via Europeana)

Late 18th century

The hot air balloon “La Gustave,” christened in honour of King Gustav II of Sweden’s visit to Lyon, France, in 1784. It was the first time a woman would fly in a hot air balloon, eight months after the very first balloon flight. (Pierre-Antoine de Machy, 1784, Swedish Nationalmuseum via Europeana)

Late 18th century

The hot air balloon “La Gustave,” christened in honour of King Gustav II of Sweden’s visit to Lyon, France, in 1784. It was the first time a woman would fly in a hot air balloon, eight months after the very first balloon flight. (Pierre-Antoine de Machy, 1784, Swedish Nationalmuseum via Europeana)

Late 18th century

The Pier of Naples with Mount Vesuvius, around 1800. (Alessandro Rositi, around 1800, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek via Europeana)

Late 18th century

The Pier of Naples with Mount Vesuvius, around 1800. (Alessandro Rositi, around 1800, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek via Europeana)

Late 18th century

Warehouses (or Factories) in Canton, Guangdong (present-day Guangzhou, some 120km northwest of Hong Kong), run by European states trading with China. (A View of the European Factories at Canton, William Daniell, around 1800, Royal Museums Greenwich via Europeana)

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Late 18th century

Warehouses (or Factories) in Canton, Guangdong (present-day Guangzhou, some 120km northwest of Hong Kong), run by European states trading with China. (A View of the European Factories at Canton, William Daniell, around 1800, Royal Museums Greenwich via Europeana)

Early 19th century

View of the Liffey Bridge (or Ha’penny Bridge) across the Liffey River in Dublin, early 19th century. (Samuel Frederick Brocas, 1818, National Library of Ireland via Europeana)

Early 19th century

View of the Liffey Bridge (or Ha’penny Bridge) across the Liffey River in Dublin, early 19th century. (Samuel Frederick Brocas, 1818, National Library of Ireland via Europeana)

Mid-19th century

Bridge over the Danube in Linz, Upper Austria (some 150km west of Vienna), around 1820. (Johann Friedrich Wizani, 1820, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek via Europeana)

Mid-19th century

Bridge over the Danube in Linz, Upper Austria (some 150km west of Vienna), around 1820. (Johann Friedrich Wizani, 1820, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek via Europeana)

Mid-19th century

The Göta Canal inaugurated at Mem in 1832, by King Karl XIV Johan of Sweden. The Canal connects Gothenburg on the Kattegat with Söderköping on the Baltic Sea, thus cutting some 600km through Sweden. (Johan Christian Berger, 1855, Swedish Nationalmuseum via Europeana)

Mid-19th century

The Göta Canal inaugurated at Mem in 1832, by King Karl XIV Johan of Sweden. The Canal connects Gothenburg on the Kattegat with Söderköping on the Baltic Sea, thus cutting some 600km through Sweden. (Johan Christian Berger, 1855, Swedish Nationalmuseum via Europeana)

Late 19th century

Ships in the Upper Pool towards London Bridge around 1890, with the St Paul‘s Cathedral in the distance on the right and the Monument to the Great Fire of London also on the right. (William Lionel Wyllie, circa 1890, Royal Museums Greenwich via Europeana)

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Late 19th century

Ships in the Upper Pool towards London Bridge around 1890, with the St Paul‘s Cathedral in the distance on the right and the Monument to the Great Fire of London also on the right. (William Lionel Wyllie, circa 1890, Royal Museums Greenwich via Europeana)

Late 19th century

A Turkish Boatman in the Harbour of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul, Turkey), in 1886. (Anders Zorn, 1886, Swedish Nationalmuseum via Europeana)

Late 19th century

A Turkish Boatman in the Harbour of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul, Turkey), in 1886. (Anders Zorn, 1886, Swedish Nationalmuseum via Europeana)

Early 20th century

Stockholm in 1912. (William Lionel Wyllie, 1912, Royal Museums Greenwich via Europeana)

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Early 20th century

Stockholm in 1912. (William Lionel Wyllie, 1912, Royal Museums Greenwich via Europeana)

Early 20th century

View of the Maashaven in Rotterdam, with busy shipping traffic and grain elevators in the back, dated 1912. (Johan Hendrik van Mastenbroek, 1912, Museum Rotterdam via Europeana)

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Early 20th century

View of the Maashaven in Rotterdam, with busy shipping traffic and grain elevators in the back, dated 1912. (Johan Hendrik van Mastenbroek, 1912, Museum Rotterdam via Europeana)

Early 20th century

As part of the British Cambrai Offensive against the German Army in France, horse-drawn artillery wagons pass the Canal du Nord. While the bridge was destroyed during the war, the Canal du Nord itself contained no water, since it was left unfinished when the war broke out in August 1914. (David McLellan, 1917, National Library of Scotland via Europeana)

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Early 20th century

As part of the British Cambrai Offensive against the German Army in France, horse-drawn artillery wagons pass the Canal du Nord. While the bridge was destroyed during the war, the Canal du Nord itself contained no water, since it was left unfinished when the war broke out in August 1914. (David McLellan, 1917, National Library of Scotland via Europeana)

Early 20th century

Dynamited bridges in Pontebba (or Pontafel, in the present-day Udine Province, north-eastern Italy), in 1917. (K.u.K. Kriegspressequartier, 1917, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek via Europeana)

Early 20th century

Dynamited bridges in Pontebba (or Pontafel, in the present-day Udine Province, north-eastern Italy), in 1917. (K.u.K. Kriegspressequartier, 1917, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek via Europeana)

Early 20th century

The Stone Bridge (or Dušan Bridge) in Skopje, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, in the late 1920s. (Unknown, 1927, National and University Library St. Kliment Ohridsksi via Europeana)

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Early 20th century

The Stone Bridge (or Dušan Bridge) in Skopje, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, in the late 1920s. (Unknown, 1927, National and University Library St. Kliment Ohridsksi via Europeana)

Late 20th century

The Brooklyn Bridge over the East River in New York. (Ökand, Unknown, Arkitektur- och designcentrum via Europeana)

Late 20th century

The Brooklyn Bridge over the East River in New York. (Ökand, Unknown, Arkitektur- och designcentrum via Europeana)